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General

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User Roles

Decision Author

Commenters

Decision Maker

Get Notified

Emails

Transactional mails

Email triggers

Consensus type

Only one

Majority

Everyone

Time and mails saved with decisionly

Calculator assumptions

Calculated savings

About the docs

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Sign in

Decisionly supports multiple methods for signing in/up. It's recommended to use the SSO (single sign on) method provided by your organization (usually Google / Microsoft). This way, all your colleagues' mail addresses are automatically available in Decisionly and you don't need to create another password.

Aside from sign-up with Google/Microsoft, you can also sign up with your E-mail address and password or with LinkedIn.

Decision Author

The Decision Author initiates the decision. To initiates a decision, there are mandatory and optional steps:

Mandatory:

  • Add a title

  • Set Due Date

  • Assign Decision Maker(s)

  • Choose the adequate decision type

Optional:

  • Add a description

  • Assign Commenters

  • Assign stakeholders who Get Notified

  • Add links

  • Attach Files

Imagine a smaller company discussing the quarter's marketing budget. The Head of Marketing makes a plan and calculates the required budget. To facilitate the decision, the Head of Marketing sets up the decision (Decision Author) in Decisionly.

Commenters

Commenters are people who have information or opinions that help for the Decision Maker to decide. However, they are not empowered to make the decision.

Imagine a smaller company discussing the quarter's marketing budget. The Head of Marketing makes a plan and calculates the required budget. To facilitate the decision, the Head of Marketing sets up the decision in Decisionly (Decision Author) and adds the Head of Finance to confirm that the requested budget is in-line with the plan. The Head of Finance is the Commenter in this case and is asked to comment before the decision is sent to the CEO.

Decision Maker

Decision Makers have the power to take the decision. With Decisionly, the only get involved once all Commenters posted or the decision is due. Depending on the decision-type, they alone make the decision (in case there are no other Decision Makers assigned or the decision is made when one Decision Maker approves) or the in a group (majority needs to approve or all Decision Makers need to approve).

Imagine a smaller company discussing the quarter's marketing budget. The Head of Marketing makes a plan and calculates the required budget. To facilitate the decision, the Head of Marketing sets up the decision (Decision Author) and adds the Head of Finance to confirm that the requested budget is in-line with the plan. The Head of Finance is the Commenter in this case and is asked to comment. As soon as the Commenters added their points, the decision is sent to the CEO (Decision Maker) to approve/reject the decision.

Get Notified

Stakeholders assigned as Get Notified are informed about the decision's outcome. Typically, they are affected by the decison but do not take an active part in the decision making process.

Imagine a smaller company discussing the quarter's marketing budget. The Head of Marketing makes a plan and calculates the required budget. To facilitate the decision, the Head of Marketing sets up the decision (Decision Author) and adds the Head of Finance to confirm that the requested budget is in-line with the plan. The Head of Finance is the Commenter in this case and is asked to comment before the decision is sent to the CEO (Decision Maker) to make the decision. To keep the marketing team informed about the available budget, the Head of Marketing adds the entire marketing team as Get Notified.

Transactional mails

Decisionly's mail are designed to streamline your workflow. This means they:

  1. Provide as much information on the open decision as possible

  2. Enable contributions to the decision without leaving the inbox:

    1. Commenters can answer the email by clicking a custom mailto-link - the answer text will be published in the decision as a comment

    2. Decision Makers can take a decision by answering the email by clicking a custom mailto-link. The answer mail provides a section to approve or deny the decision and a section to add additional commentary that will be published in the decision

Email triggers

Decisionly sends transactional emails to all stakeholders.

If Commenters are assigned in the Decision, they get the notification mail to comment on the decision when the decision is created.

Decision Makers get notified:

  1. immediately after creating a decision when there are no Commenters assigned

  2. If Commenters are assigned:

    1. if they all provided their input

    2. or one 80% of the time between creation timestamp and due-date surpassed

Stakeholders assigned as Get Notified will receive a mail once a decision is Made.

Only one

This decision type is recommended for decisions that only require the approval of one person. There can be multiple Decision Makers assigned, the one who's first to react takes the final decision.

For example: The office manager plans to place a $15k order for new equipment. It's company policy that all orders >$10k require director-level approval. The office manager authors the decision, adds multiple directors as deciders and sets the decision type to Decision is made by one only as only one director approval is needed.

Majority

This decision type is recommended for decisions that require the approval of the majority of the group of Decision Makers. This type is relevant when more than 2 Decision Makers are assigned. Only if the majority of the assigned Decision Makers approve, the decision is taken.

The CEO plans to make an offer to a CFO candidate. As per the term sheet, the majority of the members of the Board of Directors need to approve the offer for C-Level positions. The CEO authors the decision, attaches the candidates CV and offer details, assigns all directors as Decision Makers and sets the decision type to Decision is made by the majority.

Everyone

This decision type is recommended for decisions that require the approval of all Decision Makers.

Four friends want to go on vacation together. Fred is in charge of booking the house. Once Fred found a suitable house, he authors a decision, attaches a link to AirBnB and describes why this house is ideal for the vacation. He assigns his 3 friends as Decision Makers and chooses the decision type to Decision is made by everyone to ensure that all friends are okay with the house.

Calculator assumptions

There is a calculator on the landing page to estimate how much time and how many mails can be saved with Decisionly.

The calculation is made assuming the following:

With Decisionly, the:

  • Author gets 2 mails per Decision and needs 2 minutes to process each. Authoring the decision takes 4 minutes

  • Commenters get 2 mails per Decision and need 3 minutes react to each

  • Decision-makers get 1.3 mails per Decision and need 3 minutes to react to each (they get on mail per decision and might get another one if there are ofther decision-makers involved)

  • CC'd folks get one mail per decision which takes them a minute to read.

When deciding in a mail thread

  • Every stakeholder receives every mail sent below and takes 2 minutes to process each.

  • The author sends 3 mails per Decision and needs 5 minutes to write each (more mails because there are follow up mails and it takes longer because the author needs to phrase the mail more thoroughly to assign roles)

  • Each commenter sends one mail per Decision which takes 4 minutes (takes longer than commenting in Decisionly as formalities take time and there is less structure in the mail chain)

  • Each decision-maker sends one mail per Decision which takes 3 minutes (takes longer than deciding in decisionly as formalities take time and there is less structure in the mail chain)

  • CC'd folks do not send mails

Calculated savings

The chart outlines the time needed for decisions (Y axis) depending on the number of stakeholders (X axis) using Decisionly (yellow line) and using email threads (red line). The table below outlines the calculated savings for decisions with up to 20 stakeholders. The allocation of stakeholder roles is an assumption.